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  • #320120

    A certain host on a certain Jewelry channel said  that the Gem with oval  shape holds its value more than the others.    I would have guessed a Round would hold value more. So, the rogue reporter must get busy and research this topic.   I know most vintage pieces do not have this shape.

    #320131

    TVSQ Michelle
    Gazette Editor
    New York

    Interesting! I would have guessed round too  :nod:   but I guess if we look at vintage, historical jewelry there’s probably more oval designs than round? Maybe?  :scratch:

    #320152

    Interesting! I would have guessed round too :nod: but I guess if we look at vintage, historical jewelry there’s probably more oval designs than round? Maybe? :scratch:

    I believe  Oval is fastest cut and easier . Just guessing because you see more of those today, but I doubt if is more valuable or liked.  I don’t know anyone with it as their engagement ring.

    #320154

    LadyNine
    Gazette Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    The shapes are influenced by a couple of things, including the rough shape, type of stone, quality of stone, money to cut vs. what it will sell for, etc. A rectangular step emerald cut is the least expensive for an emerald stone because the cutter has less waste. It’s easier to do, less likely to cause problems with the stone, and maximizes the size you get versus the rough you had to buy.

    Vintage jewelry shapes depend on a couple of things, like the era and cutting methods invented at that time.

    In an oval cut, you cut away less of the rough versus in a round. Rounder diamonds (for example) are more expensive simply because it takes a bigger diamond rough to make a round brilliant cut versus the size you’d need to create a nice oval cut.

    There are, again, other factors that determine a gemstone’s value over time, not just the cut. Amethysts, for example, were once considered very valuable, saved only for royalty, because they weren’t easy to get. That’s not the case today. To tell people that oval shape holds value more than other cuts is bunk.  :laugh1:

    But bunk is really common in the jewelry world! It sells too!

    #320155

    The shapes are influenced by a couple of things, including the rough shape, type of stone, quality of stone, money to cut vs. what it will sell for, etc. A rectangular step emerald cut is the least expensive for an emerald stone because the cutter has less waste. It’s easier to do, less likely to cause problems with the stone, and maximizes the size you get versus the rough you had to buy.

    Vintage jewelry shapes depend on a couple of things, like the era and cutting methods invented at that time.

    In an oval cut, you cut away less of the rough versus in a round. Rounder diamonds (for example) are more expensive simply because it takes a bigger diamond rough to make a round brilliant cut versus the size you’d need to create a nice oval cut.

    There are, again, other factors that determine a gemstone’s value over time, not just the cut. Amethysts, for example, were once considered very valuable, saved only for royalty, because they weren’t easy to get. That’s not the case today. To tell people that oval shape holds value more than other cuts is bunk. :laugh1:

    But bunk is really common in the jewelry world! It sells too!

    I think that would mean Rounds hold their value better.  I think most engagement rings are Round and I think that still holds today, even though things are a changing.  I put this question to some experts , but not from GIA and I should hear from them soon.  I also have gem stone cutters  I am following  on Twitter I can ask.

    #320156

    LadyNine
    Gazette Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    I think that would mean Rounds hold their value better. I think most engagement rings are Round and I think that still holds today, even though things are a changing. I put this question to some experts , but not from GIA and I should hear from them soon. I also have gem stone cutters I am following on Twitter I can ask.

    Right, if shape were why a stone is valuable. It isn’t. A round stone is more because it cost more in the first place. But it certainly isn’t more valuable just because it’s round.

    #320177

    I think that would mean Rounds hold their value better. I think most engagement rings are Round and I think that still holds today, even though things are a changing. I put this question to some experts , but not from GIA and I should hear from them soon. I also have gem stone cutters I am following on Twitter I can ask.

    Right, if shape were why a stone is valuable. It isn’t. A round stone is more because it cost more in the first place. But it certainly isn’t more valuable just because it’s round.

     

    Well ‘Linda” will shed light on the subject.  She was the #1 student in class at GIA in 2005 . Jewelry professional certificate.  GIA certification in Pearls, Color Gem Stones , and Diamonds.  I emailed her with the question.   I also know that the Precious Metals Brokerage House I use sells Diamonds as an investment and they sell Rounds.  So, I believe we all are correct.

    #320178

    Interesting! I would have guessed round too :nod: but I guess if we look at vintage, historical jewelry there’s probably more oval designs than round? Maybe? :scratch:

    Most vintage pieces I see are Round and Marquise , not counting Emeralds .

    #320181

    LadyNine
    Gazette Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    Interesting! I would have guessed round too :nod: but I guess if we look at vintage, historical jewelry there’s probably more oval designs than round? Maybe? :scratch:

    Most vintage pieces I see are Round and Marquise , not counting Emeralds .

    I see a variety in vintage, but again, that depends on the era and the type of stone; “new” cuts of something tend to appear a lot around the time they were invented.

    Baguettes were “invented” in the 20s/30s, so you won’t see them before that, but you’ll see them a lot in Art Deco. Assher cuts were invented around 1900, so they appear a lot around that time because it’s new. Of course round stones are common, but how many facets, whether it has a culet, size of table etc.

    I have a book that gets into identifying jewelry by period, and it gets into what cuts were invented/used when.

    #320200

    I think that would mean Rounds hold their value better. I think most engagement rings are Round and I think that still holds today, even though things are a changing. I put this question to some experts , but not from GIA and I should hear from them soon. I also have gem stone cutters I am following on Twitter I can ask.

    Right, if shape were why a stone is valuable. It isn’t. A round stone is more because it cost more in the first place. But it certainly isn’t more valuable just because it’s round.

     

    Well ‘Linda” will shed light on the subject. She was the #1 student in class at GIA in 2005 . Jewelry professional certificate. GIA certification in Pearls, Color Gem Stones , and Diamonds. I emailed her with the question. I also know that the Precious Metals Brokerage House I use sells Diamonds as an investment and they sell Rounds. So, I believe we all are correct.

    Linda (Miss GIA)  got back to me and I sent email to Michelle #1 for confirmation.  She said a Round maintains value better than an Oval, as we thought. So,  the host got this one wrong.

    I am watching  JTV Vault Show right now and will report on what I see.   They had more Gem stones than three.  The host got that wrong too. However, she usually spot on

    #320219

    TVSQ Michelle
    Gazette Editor
    New York

    Just saw your email, Gary:good:

    #320220

    TVSQ Michelle
    Gazette Editor
    New York

    BTW I can’t get this ring out of my mind :love3:

    I :heart: :heart: :heart: everything about this ring! and just learned a new “cut” too! Yellow gold, vintage-y looking diamonds, art-deco design, peridot stone, the cut look check-er-y (my made up word) which I’ve always liked! :please:

    Oh, and I love navette, which is popular in art deco.

    I think I’ll do peridot for that.

    (I think it ate the rest of my posts, so I’ll stop for now!)

    #320226

    LadyNine
    Gazette Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    BTW I can’t get this ring out of my mind :love3:

    I :heart: :heart: :heart: everything about this ring! and just learned a new “cut” too! Yellow gold, vintage-y looking diamonds, art-deco design, peridot stone, the cut look check-er-y (my made up word) which I’ve always liked! :please:

    Oh, and I love navette, which is popular in art deco.

    I think I’ll do peridot for that.

    (I think it ate the rest of my posts, so I’ll stop for now!)

    Me too. I absolutely love it, but unfortunately it sold and is in the hands of a very lucky collector! I really like the gold detail around the diamonds.

    #320236

    TVSQ Michelle
    Gazette Editor
    New York

    I wonder how much a handmade custom copy would cost… say by an artist on Etsy?  :please:

    https://www.etsy.com/search?explicit=1&q=custom+ring+gold&ref=guided_search_0&guided_search=1

    #320241

    Just saw your email, Gary! :good:

    That’s me a regular Columbo.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 56 total)

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