Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #341998

    LadyNine
    Panel Ambassador
    Pennsylvania
    #341999

    LadyNine
    Panel Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    First let’s look at what a Keshi pearl is.

    Usually, a pearl is formed when something is embedded in an oyster, and the oyster develops a layer of nacre over it. This is true even with cultured pearls. The shape of the nucleus determines the shape of the pearl, which is round-ish.

    The Keshi pearl is not formed that way. They don’t have that center to determine the shape. They can vary in shape, but they’re made of solid nacre, which gives them a lot of luster.

    Keshi pearls are actually a byproduct of accidents in the cultivation process, so with advances in pearl cultivation, including X-rays to see how things are developing, they’re becoming more rare.

    #342000

    LadyNine
    Panel Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    You have the following choices for this special:

    Prehnite: With white cultured freshwater keshi pearls
    Labradorite: With gray cultured freshwater keshi pearls
    Aquamarine: With cultured freshwater keshi pearls
    Morganite: With pink cultured freshwater keshi pearls

    #342001

    LadyNine
    Panel Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    Labradorite:

    Morganite:

    Prehnite:

    #342002

    LadyNine
    Panel Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    The aquamarine is extended delivery:

    #342003

    LadyNine
    Panel Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    On:

    #342004

    LadyNine
    Panel Ambassador
    Pennsylvania

    The prehnite has interesting inclusions in it:

    #342025

    Host Michelle
    Panel Founder
    New York

    I enjoyed learning this! :thanks: Lady Nine M! :kiss:

    I wish I appreciate the visual of Keshi pearls – but to me they look like teeh :giggle-cat:

    First let’s look at what a Keshi pearl is. Usually, a pearl is formed when something is embedded in an oyster, and the oyster develops a layer of nacre over it. This is true even with cultured pearls. The shape of the nucleus determines the shape of the pearl, which is round-ish. The Keshi pearl is not formed that way. They don’t have that center to determine the shape. They can vary in shape, but they’re made of solid nacre, which gives them a lot of luster. Keshi pearls are actually a byproduct of accidents in the cultivation process, so with advances in pearl cultivation, including X-rays to see how things are developing, they’re becoming more rare.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

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